Archive for the 'Mindfulness' Category

Aug 06 2016

Relaxation Script

Relaxation Script

Prepare to relax by finding a comfortable place where you won’t be disturbed for 20-30 minutes…loosen any tight or restrictive clothing and remember relaxation is something that happens all by itself if you let it…

and learning to allow relax is allowing relaxation to happen…no one really knows exactly how you relax, but as you think relaxing thoughts, your body responds by letting go…

we don’t really know how you walk, talk, ore scratch your head…you just decide to do these things and your body responds…in the same way your body responds to your decision to let go and relax…

as you learn to relax, please don’t concern yourself with how quickly you are relaxing or whether you are relaxing deeply enough…

you will find, as you practice relaxation, that at different times, you will relax at different rates…sometimes relaxation will occur slowly and subtly…

other times you will relax very deeply, very quickly…

and it really doesn’t matter how you relax at this time, just that you notice how relaxation feels to you when it does occur..

as you begin to let go and begin to notice the sensations of relaxation you have …

that learning to relax is learning to allow relaxation to happen. Your body knows how to relax and as you begin to breathe more deeply, relax your muscles, and use peaceful imagery you will be able to relax, feel more comfortable, and manage challenges more easily.

just allow the intelligence of your body and mind guide you…

Start by finding a spot furthest away from where you are and stare at it. You will notice your eyes becoming slightly tired, they may begin to blink, signaling you are ready to close your eyes and move from your external focus to an internal focus.

Begin to relax more deeply by taking 3 deep, slow breaths.

As you inhale, let that “in” breath be associated with fresh air, peacefulness and relaxation.

As you exhale, let that “out” breath be associated with the release of any unnecessary stress and tension.

As you breath more deeply, allow the muscles in your body to also more deeply relax. Begin with the muscles in your feet and legs, take a deep breath and as you “let go”, allow the muscles in your feet and legs to more deeply relax.

Then the muscles in your stomach and chest…lower back and upper back…arms and hands…neck and shoulders…face and even the muscles around your tongue…allow those muscles to more deeply relax.As you find your body becoming more relaxed, you may notice that your mind is also becoming more quiet, calm and still.

Take a few moments and enjoy this comfortable feeling in your mind and body.

Relaxation is something you learn to do and the more you do it, the easier it becomes…

In order to deepen your level of relaxation, allow an image of a staircase with 10 stairs come into your mind. Notice what the staircase looks like, whether it is wooden or steel, spiral or straight, indoors or outdoors…

Imagine that as you step down each stair, you are stepping into a deeper and deeper level of relaxation. Count backwards from 10 to 1, and when you get to 1 imagine stepping off the stair into a peaceful place, maybe your favorite vacation place or an imaginary beach, woods, or by a pond, whatever comes to your mind… just allow yourself to go there…

So begin to count backwards to yourself from 10…9…8…deeper and deeper…7…6…5…4…3…2…and 1.

Now, allow an image to form in your mind of that safe and beautiful place and just be there…notice what you can see, hear, feel, and smell in that peaceful place…enjoy being there and stay as long as you want…as you allow yourself to become more and more deeply relaxed…

Continue to breathe deeply and comfortably. When you are ready to come back, start to open your eyes, notice the increased light against your eyes and any sounds in the room. Stretch your muscles. Come back refreshed, relaxed and feeling better than before.

When you wake up, write or draw about your relaxation experience and the peaceful place you imagined. Allow yourself to explore any of this experience that you want.

From Guided Imagery for Self-Healing, by Marty Rossman (2000)

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Mar 14 2015

Bibliography: Mindfulness Series

 Imagery Bibliography Specific

Hall, Eric, Hall, Carol, Stradling, Pamela, Young, Diane.(2006). Guided imagery: Creative interventions in counselling and psychotherapy. London:Sage Books

Hopper, J. P. (2014, August 26). Recovered memories of abuse: scientific journals and resources. Retrieved from Jim Hopper, PhD: http://jimhopper.com/

Levine, P. R. (2008). Healing Trauma: A pioneering program for restoring the wisdom to your body. Boulder: Sounds True.

Levine, P. R. (2011). In an unspoken voice: How the body releases trauma and restores goodness. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books.

Rossman, M. L. (2000). Guided imagery for self-healing. Novato, CA: HJ Kramer/New World Library.

Siegel, D. J. (2012). Pocket guide to interpersonal neurobiology: An integrative handbook of the mind. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Mindfulness Bibliography

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Bernard, S. J. (2007, May 18). Fatal Injuries Among Children by Race and Ethnicity — United States, 1999–2002. Retrieved from Center for Disease Control: Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR): http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/ss5605a1.htm

Berry, J. (1985, May 23). The tragedy of Gilbert Gauthe. Retrieved January 28, 2014, from Bishop Accountability.org: http://www.bishop-accountability.org/news/1985_05_23_Berry_TheTragedy.htm

Blaustein, M. E. (2010). Treating traumatic stress in children and adolescents: How to foster resilience through attachment, self-regulation, and competency. New York: Guilford Press.

Boynton, R. (1994, November 28). Till death do us part: the trial of Janet Malcom and Jeffrey Masson. Retrieved from Robert S. Boynton: http://www.robertboynton.com/articleDisplay.php?article_id=20

Brackinridge, C. (2001). Spoilsports: Understanding and preventing sexual exploitation in sport. London: Routledge.

Bremner, J. (1999, April). Does stress damage the brain? Retrieved from PubMed.gov: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10202566

Butler, Susan. (1986). Non-Competitive games for people of all ages.

Catherall, D. R. (1992). Back from the brink: A family guide to overcoming traumatic stress. New York: Bantam Books.

CDC. (2010). Leading Causes of Death in Males in the United States. Retrieved from Center for Disease Control and Prevention: http://www.cdc.gov/men/lcod/2010/LCOD_WHITEmen2010.pdf

CDC. (2012, August 24). Sexual violence at a glance. Retrieved March 4, 2015, from CEnters for Disease Control 1991-2011 high school youth risk behavior survey data.

Child Maltreatment Facts at a Glance: Center for Disease Control. (2014). Retrieved January 8, 2015, from National Criminal Justice Reference Resource: https://www.ncjrs.gov/childabuse/prevalence.html

College, H. (1985). The complete letters fo Sigmund Freud to Wilhelm Fliess, 1887-1904, excerpts. Retrieved from Frued-Fleiss Letters-Haverford College.

Courtois, C. A. (1999). Recollections of sexual abuse: Treatment principles and guidelines. New York: W.W. Norton & Company.

Davidson, R. J. (2012). The emotional life of your brain: How its unique patterns affect the way you think, feel and live- and how you can change them . London: Hudson Street Press.

Davidson, R. J., & with Begley, S. (2012). The emotional life of your brain. New York: Hudson Street Press Penguin Group.

Duncan, B. L., Miller, S., Wampold, B. E., & Hubble, M. A. (2010). The heart & soul of Change: Delivering what works in therapy. Washington, DC: American Psychological Association.

Eisen, J. (2014, August 21). Sigmund Freud and the Cover-Up of “The Aetiology of Hysteria”. Retrieved from Jonathon Eisen: http://www.bibliotecapleyades.net/ciencia/supressed_inventions/suppressed_inventions16.htm

Emerson, D. &. (2011). Overcoming trauma through yoga: Reclaiming your body. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books.

Freud ccc. (2014, August 25). Retrieved from Rigorous Intuition: http://www.rigorousintuition.ca/board2/viewtopic.php?f=8&t=38086

Gartner, R. B. (1997). Memories of sexual betrayal: Truth, fantasy, repression, and dissociation. Northvale, NJ: Jason Aronson, Inc.

Gottman, J. (1999). The marriage clinic: A scientifically-based marital therapy. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Gottman, J. (n.d.). Raising Emotionally Intelligent Children.

Hall, Eric, Hall, Carol, Stradling, Pamela, Young, Diane.(2006). Guided imagery: Creative interventions in counselling and psychotherapy. London:Sage Books

Hall, S. (2013, June 17). Repairing bad memories. Retrieved from MIT Technology Review: http://www.technologyreview.com/featuredstory/515981/repairing-bad-memories/

Herman, J. (1992). Trauma and recovery: The aftermath of violence-from domestic abuse to political terror. New York: Basic Books.

Hopper, J. P. (2014, August 26). Recovered memories of abuse: scientific journals and resources. Retrieved from Jim Hopper, PhD: http://jimhopper.com/

Hudgins, M. K. (2002). Experiential treatment for PTSD: The therapeutic spiral model. New York: Springer Publishing Company.

Imber-Black, E. (1998, July 1). The Power of Secrets. Retrieved from Psychology Today: http://www.psychologytoday.com/articles/200909/the-power-secrets

Kempe, H. C. (1962). The battered child syndrome. Journal of the American Medical Association , 181:17-24. Retrieved from file:///C:/Users/Bill%20Martin/Downloads/The_Battered_Child_Syndrome_sm.pdf

Kimmerling, R., Ouimette, P., & Wolfe, J. (2002). Gender and PTSD. New York: The Guilford Press.

Levine, P. R. (2008). Healing Trauma: A pioneering program for restoring the wisdom to your body. Boulder: Sounds True.

Levine, P. R. (2011). In an unspoken voice: How the body releases trauma and restores goodness. Berkeley: North Atlantic Books.

Lewis, T., Amini, F., & Lannon, R. (2001). A general theory of love. New York: Vintage Books.

Masson v. New Yorker Magazine, Inc. (89-1799), 501 U.S. 496. (1991). Retrieved from Cornell University Law School Legal Information: http://www.law.cornell.edu/supct/html/89-1799.ZO.html

Masson, J. M. (1984). The assault on truth: Freud’s suppression of the seduction theory. New York: Harper Perrennial.

McCarthy, J. (2009). Deep deception: Ireland’s swimming scandals. Dublin: The Obrien Press Ltd.

McKay, M. F. (1994). Couple skills. Oakland : New Harbinger Publications.

Memory. (n.d.). Retrieved FEbruary 14, 2014, from Memory: http://psychology4a.com/memory%202.htm

Meyers, J. (2008). A short history of child protection in America. Retrieved from A short history of child protection in America: http://www.americanbar.org/content/dam/aba/publishing/insights_law_society/ChildProtectionHistory.authcheckdam.pdf

Mintz, s. (2015, January 8). Placing childhood sexual abuse in historical perspective. Retrieved January 8, 2015, from The Immanent Frame: http://blogs.ssrc.org/tif/2012/07/13/placing-childhood-sexual-abuse-in-historical-perspective/

Ogden, Pat.(2015). Sensorimotor psychotherapy: Interventions for trauma and attachment. New York: W.W. Norton & Company

Penn state scandal fast facts. (2015, January 25). Retrieved from CNN: http://www.cnn.com/2013/10/28/us/penn-state-scandal-fast-facts/

Pope, K. (2001, October 21). Sex with clients. Retrieved from Ken Pope: http://www.kspope.com/sexiss/sexencyc.php

Robinson, P. (1993). Freud and his critics. Berkeley: University of California Press.

Rossman, M. L. (2000). Guided imagery for self-healing. Novato, CA: HJ Kramer/New World Library.

Rothschild, B. (2000). The body remembers: The psychophysiology of trauma and trauma treatment. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Schiller, D. M.-H. (2009, November 9). Preventing Preventing the return of fear in humans using reconsolidation update mechanisms. Retrieved from Nature: http://www.psych.nyu.edu/phelpslab/files/Schiller_nature.pdf

Siegel, D. J. (2012). Pocket guide to interpersonal neurobiology: An integrative handbook of the mind. New York: W.W. Norton & Co.

Siegel, D. M. (2010). About interpersonal neurobiology. Retrieved from Daniel Siegel: Inspire to rewire: http://www.drdansiegel.com/about/interpersonal_neurobiology/

Snowball, O. (2014, September 18). Cegrin Goodman Teen Institute and Operation Snowball. Retrieved from http://www.os-cgti.org/

Sobel, Jeffrey. (1984).  Everybody Wins:393 non-competitive games for young children.

Sullaway, F. J. (19709). Freud, Biologist of the Mind. New York: Harvard University Press.

Tannen, D. (1990). You Just Don’t Understand: Women and Men in Conversation. New York: William Morrow and Company.

Taylor, K. (2004). Brainwashing: The science of thought control. New York: Oxford University Press.

The second mile sandusky scandal: Searching for truth in a fog of deception. (2012, August 1). Retrieved from http://notpsu.blogspot.com/2012/08/dr-alycia-chambers-psychological.html

Triplett, H. (2004). The misnomer of Freud’s “seduction theory”. The Journal of the History of Ideas, 65-4, p 647-665.

Van der Kolk, B. A. (1996). Traumatic stress: The effects of overwhelming experience on mind, body, and society. New York: Guilford Press.

Webster, R. (2014, August 22). Charcot, Freud, Hysteria: lost in the labyrinth. Retrieved from Richard Webster: http://www.richardwebster.net/freudandcharcot.html

WHO. (2002). World Report on Violence and Health: Summary. Retrieved January 29, 2014, from World Health Organization: http://www.who.int/violence_injury_prevention/violence/world_report/en/summary_en.pdf

Wright, L. (1994). Remembering satan: A tragic case of recovered memory. New York: Vintage Books.

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Dec 09 2014

A Review: Clearing the Path: Opening the Spiritual Frontier by Dr. Robert Mark

Summary: Dr. Mark gets an A+ for writing an interesting narrative of his personal and professional development. However, a diminished grade for encouraging people to dispense with their critical thinking to entertain the possibility of higher powers and alternative realities. Discouraging a belief in science is a surprising part of this book and therapists especially should not take this advice seriously, lest they begin to practice unethically.
My acknowledgement: I was involved in Dr. Mark’s men’s program and have insights about him and his work. Perhaps there is no good ending in a relationship with people or organizations. This was true for me, so any negative views I express may be colored by my ending experiences.

I was very curious about this book when I learned it had been written and recently had a chance to read it. I surprisingly enjoyed it, as an autobiographical account of the author’s development as a human being and professional therapist. In person, Dr. Mark is both impressive and charismatic.

As the depth of his book demonstrates, he’s intelligent and highly skilled as a therapist. You can tell he has an ease and comfort with traditional forms of therapy and having seen him in action, I can confirm he is an exceptional agent of change in people’s lives.

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